NBCI Search

Register for the Latest Information on Good Health Tips

NBCI Health Television

The 5 foods you should eat every day The 5 Foods You Should Eat Every Day

Eating right on a budget can be a challenge, but it's certainly not impossible. Holly Robinson Peete presents this "cheat sheet" to the 5 inexpensive foods you should eat everyday for optimum health.

The Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables: A Scientific Overview The research behind eating more fruits and vegetables
The Black Church and the Importance of Good Nutrition
What the black church needs to
say to its congregations
about good nutrition.
How Science-based and Community-based
Organizations May
Work with the
Black Church

Producing Effective
Health Promotion
and Policy Initiatives
NBCI Declares WAR on Tobacco, Smoking and Tobacco
Companies
African American
Leaders Call on
Tobacco Industry
to Stop Targeting
Their Community

Links to Minority Health Resources

NBCI Declares a National Health Emergency in the Black Church

Health Emergency Declaration (HED)

The Black Church and the Importance of Good Nutrition

A Scientific Overview for Health Professionals
A review of the literature from 1999 to 2001 by Dianne Hyson, Ph.D., M.S., R.D.
Produce for Better Health Foundation [read more]

It Has What? Find Out How Many Calories are in Your Daily Meals

Ever wonder how many calories are in the daily foods that you consume? This growing list is a shocking revelation of a few of the factors that keep you from your ideal weight. Calories in Daily Foods

  • Fresh vegetables and fruits should make up the largest part of your healthy foods grocery list. Vegetables and fruits have vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and they are usually low in calories. We all need at least five to nine servings of vegetables and fruits every day to choose a variety of fruits and vegetables that everyone in your family will enjoy.
  • Most of your grain and cereal products should be made from whole grains, not from refined flours. This part of your list includes whole grain breads, whole grain pastas, and whole grain breakfast cereals. Whole grains are important for vitamins, minerals, and for fiber, which is often lacking in modern diets. Read labels to look for 100 percent whole grain or 100 percent whole wheat to be sure you are getting whole grain products.
  • Your protein and meat choices should consist mostly of fish, poultry and lean meats. Eggs, nuts, seeds and legumes are also good protein choices. Choose fresh and frozen unbreaded meats and fish. Avoid breaded, deep-fried convenience foods that you put in the oven. They are high in fats and sodium.
  • Beverages should be kept simple. Water, low fat milk, juices and herbal teas are all good choices. If you choose soft drinks, choose diet sodas and soft drinks to avoid extra sugar.
  • Dairy products should include low fat milk, yogurt and cheese. If you do not want cows' milk, choose soy and rice beverages, calcium fortified orange juice, or goats' milks and cheese.
  • Be careful with dressings, cooking oils and condiments. They are sneaky sources of refined sugar and poor quality oils. Read labels to choose dressings made with olive oil, canola oil or walnut oil. Choose low fat mayonnaise for your sandwiches and choose canola oil and olive oil for cooking.
  • Frozen foods are a convenient way to keep vegetables on hand. There are also prepared meals that you can pop into the microwave or oven. These can be convenient and healthy if you choose low fat versions with good portion sizes. Read labels and chose frozen foods wisely. Avoid frozen pizzas, pocket-sandwiches, deep-fried appetizers, and breaded foods.
  • Foods in cans and jars are also very convenient. Look for low-sodium soups, vegetables and sauces. Avoid high fat gravies and high calorie foods like canned spaghetti and ravioli products.
  • For sandwiches, choose peanut butter or other nut butters, low fat turkey slices or sliced roast beef. Avoid processed lunch meats, sausages and hot dogs.
  • Don't load up on high calorie treats and desserts. Choose fresh fruits, healthy nuts, seeds and whole grain crackers for snacks.

The National Black Church Initiative is developing a grocery list for all of its congregants. Soon, you will be able to login and get important information concerning calories and the suggested grocery list that we recommend.

The Importance of Food Choices to Health

The importance of food choices to healthUnhealthy diets and physical inactivity are leading causes of premature death, disabilities, and high health-care costs in the United States. According to the U.S.Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), poor diets, along with physicalinactivity, cause about 310,000 to 580,000 premature deaths each year (Table 1;McGinnis & Foege, 1993). That is five times the number of people killed by guns, AIDS,and drug use combined.

Unhealthy eating is a major cause of obesity, heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes,high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, tooth decay and other healthproblems. Poor diet can result in disabilities and loss of independence from stroke,heart disease or osteoporosis-related hip fracture, or blindness and limb amputations due to diabetes.

This segment is taken from The Center for Science in the Public Interest pamphlet titled "Anyone's Guess; The Need for Nutritious Labeling at Fastfood and Other Chain Restaurants" [Click Here for the Whole Pamphlet]

Table 1: Leading Contributors to Premature Death
(deaths per year)
Diet and Physical Inactivity 310,000 - 580,000
Tobacco 260,000 - 470,000
Alcohol 70,000 - 110,000
Microbial Agents 90,000
Toxic Agents 60,000 - 110,000
Firearms 35,000
Sexual Behavior 30,000
Motor Vehicles 25,000

Easy steps to great health through Good Nutrition

Video of Good Food & Active Living for African American Families
Featuring Duane Martin, Tisha Campbell-Martin

As the health crisis continues to rage in the African American community, the black church must assume a more activist role as health advocate for good nutrition. Multiple public health studies commissioned by universities, foundations and the federal government confirmed that poor nutrition, lack of physical exercise, and the lack of access to primary care are the chief reasons for the widening of the health gap.

Produce Nutrition
Produce Nutrition
Apple 1 medium 154 80 0 0 0 170 22 5 16 0 2 8 0 2
Artichoke 1 artichoke 56 25 0 0 70 180 6 3 1 2 2 10 2 2
Asparagus 5 spears 93 25 0 0 0 230 4 2 2 2 10 15 2 2
Avocado 1/5 medium 30 55 45 5 0 170 3 3 0 1 0 4 0 0
Banana 1 medium 126 100 0 0 0 400 29 4 21 1 0 15 0 2
Bell Pepper 1 medium 148 30 0 0 0 270 7 2 4 1 8 190 2 2
Blueberries 1 cup 140 100 10 1 0 105 27 3 11 11 0 15 0 2
Broccoli 1 medium stalk 148 45 0 .5 55 540 8 5 3 5 15 220 6 6
Brussels Sprouts 4 sprouts 84 40 5 .5 25 290 6 3 2 2 8 120 2 0
Cantaloupe 1/4 medium 134 50 0 0 25 280 12 1 11 1 100 80 2 2
Carrot 7" long 78 35 0 0 40 280 8 2 5 1 270 10 2 0
Cauliflower 1/6 medium 99 25 0 0 30 270 5 2 2 2 0 100 2 2
Celery 2 medium 110 20 0 0 100 350 5 2 0 1 2 15 4 2
Cherries 21 cherries; 1 cup 140 90 0 .5 0 300 22 3 19 2 2 15 2 2
Collards 2 cups chopped 72 25 0 0 30 25 5 1 2 1 50 30 2 0
Cucumber 1/3 medium 99 15 0 0 0 170 3 1 2 1 4 10 2 2
Figs (dried) 2 figs 38 100 0 0 5 230 23 3 25 1 0 0 4 2
Grapefruit 1/2 medium 154 60 0 0 0 230 16 6 10 1 15 110 2 0
Grapes 1-1/2 cups 138 90 10 1 0 270 24 1 23 1 2 25 2 2
Green Beans 3/4 cup 83 25 0 0 0 200 5 3 2 1 4 10 4 2
Green Cabbage 1/12 medium head 84 25 0 0 20 190 5 2 3 1 0 70 4 2
Green Onion 1/4 cup chopped 25 10 0 0 5 70 2 1 1 0 2 8 0 0
Honeydew Melon 1/10 medium 134 50 0 0 35 310 13 1 12 1 2 45 0 2
Iceberg Lettuce 1/6 medium head 89 15 0 0 10 120 3 1 2 1 4 6 2 2
Kiwifruit 2 medium 148 100 10 1 0 480 24 4 16 2 2 240 6 4
Leaf Lettuce 1-1/2 cups shreaded 85 15 0 0 30 230 4 2 2 1 40 6 4 0
Lemon 1 medium 58 15 0 0 5 90 5 1 1 0 0 40 2 0
Lime 1 medium 67 20 0 0 0 75 7 2 0 0 0 35 0 0
Mango 1/2 mango 104 70 5 .5 0 125 17 1 15 0 40 15 0 0
Mushrooms 5 medium 84 20 0 0 0 300 3 1 0 3 0 2 0 2
Mustard Greens 1-1/2 cups chopped 84 25 0 0 40 230 3 1 1 2 90 100 0 0
Nectarine 1 medium 140 70 0 .5 0 300 16 2 12 1 4 15 0 2
Onion 1 medium 148 60 0 0 5 240 14 3 9 2 0 20 4 2
Orange 1 medium 154 70 0 0 0 260 21 7 14 1 2 130 6 2
Peach 1 medium 98 40 0 0 0 190 10 2 9 1 2 10 0 0
Pear 1 medium 166 100 10 1 0 210 25 4 17 1 0 10 2 0
Pineapple 2 slices 112 60 0 0 10 115 16 1 13 1 0 25 2 2
Plums 2 medium 132 80 10 1 0 220 19 2 10 1 6 20 0 0
Potato 1 medium 148 100 0 0 0 270 26 3 3 4 0 45 2 6
Prunes 5 prunes 42 110 0 0 0 280 25 3 18 1 10 2 2 4
Radishes 7 radishes 85 15 0 0 25 230 3 0 2 1 0 30 2 0
Raisins 1/4 cup 40 130 0 0 10 310 31 2 29 1 0 0 2 6
Raspberries 1 cup 125 50 0 0 0 160 17 8 12 1 0 40 2 2
Romaine Lettuce 6 leaves 85 20 0 .5 0 140 3 1 2 1 20 4 2 2
Spinach 1-1/2 cup shredded 85 40 0 0 160 130 10 5 0 2 70 25 6 20
Strawberries 8 medium 147 45 0 0 0 270 12 4 8 1 0 160 2 4
Summer Squash 1/2 medium 98 20 0 0 0 260 4 2 2 1 6 30 2 2
Sweet Corn 1 medium ear 90 80 10 1 0 240 18 3 5 3 2 10 0 2
Sweet Potato 1 medium, 5" long,
2" diameter
130 130 0 0 45 350 33 4 7 2 440 30 2 2
Tangerine 1 medium 109 50 0 .5 0 180 15 3 12 1 0 50 4 0
Tomato 1 medium 148 35 0 .5 5 360 7 1 4 1 20 40 2 2
Watermelon 1/18 medium melon;
2 cups diced
280 80 0 0 10 230 27 2 25 1 20 25 2 4
Percent daily values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs. Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Produce Marketing Association

The National Cancer Institute
African-American men face a number of serious health risks:
Now they’re a new number that can help.
Body & Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Eating and Living is a health program developed for African American churches. The program encourages church members to eat a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables every day for better health.

African-American Men and Good Nutrition

African-American men suffer much higher rates of almost every type of cancer than white men, and they're more likely to have heart disease and high blood pressure," said Secretary Thompson. "These leading causes of death are largely preventable through changes in our lifestyle choices.

The 9 A Day campaign will help us to start emphasizing prevention of this epidemic by letting African-American men know the vital importance of eating fruits and vegetables to their overall health.

African-American Men Suffer Extreme Health Disparities

NBCI is focusing its efforts on reaching African-American men because they suffer disproportionately from a variety of health conditions. African-American men:

  • Overall, have the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates, as well as the highest rates for certain cancers of any ethnic or racial group.
  • Have the highest rates of prostate cancer and high blood pressure in the world.
  • Are twice as likely as white men to develop diabetes.
  • Develop diabetes and high blood pressure earlier in life than other men, and are more likely to suffer serious side-effects from these diseases.
  • Have higher mortality rates from heart disease and obesity than other ethnic groups.

Although black men are among the most seriously affected by diet-related chronic diseases, they have the lowest consumption of fruits and vegetables overall, eating an average of only 3.1 servings a day of the 9 recommended for men by federal nutrition policy. Only 3 percent of black men are even aware that men should eat 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day for better health.

"We must not ignore the excessive burden of cancer in black men," said von Eschenbach. "Black men have the highest rates of prostate, lung, colon, oral, and stomach cancers and are over 140 percent more likely to die from cancer than white men. Since we recognize one-third of all cancers are related to diet, this is one area that demands our attention. By eating 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day, the risk of diet-related diseases affecting the African-American community can be lowered.

The National Cancer Institute killed the 9-A-Day program. We are baffled as to its reasoning. The National Black Church Inititative is reviving this campaign without any funding. NBCI feel that the information contained in this program is too valuable to be wasted. The statistics of chronic disease and the high death rate among African-American men is just too alarming not to have this critical information available to them.

You can help the National Black Church Initiative fight for this progam by writing to the National Cancer Insitute and tell them that we want this program revived and fully funded. Here is how you contact NCI:

On-Line:
http://www.cancer.gov/help

Telephone:
1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237)
TTY: 1-800-332-8615

E-mail:
cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov

Post:
Write to the National Cancer Institute at:
NCI Public Inquiries Office
6116 Executive Boulevard
Room 3036A
Bethesda, MD 20892-8322

This is a perfect example of how the government namely HHS, CDC, and NIH contributes to health disparities by killing critical programs like the 9-A-Day campaign because of the lack of funding. The government needs to help organizations like NBCI create more targeted health-promotion campaigns. NBCI needs your financial support to keep this program going --> DONATION (NBCI DONATION Button/Page)

African-American Men: Count yourself healthy
Eat 9 Serving a Day

African-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a DayAfrican-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a DayAfrican-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a Day

African-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a Day: Page 1 African-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a Day: Page 2 African-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a Day: Page 3 African-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a Day: Page 4 African-American Men: Count yourself healthy Eat 9 Serving a Day: Page 5

Diet and Disease


The United States Department of Agriculture has done a wonderful job in helping to clarify how nutrition can inpact these diseases.

AIDS/HIV

The American Cancer Society

Food Safety Guide for People with HIV

Heart Disease

Diabetes

Cancer

Weight and Obesity

Allergies and Food Sensitivities

Eating Disorders

Digestive Diseases & Disorders

How to find out where you are - Nutritionally.
And what you can do about it.



For more information concerning the food pyramid, visit:
http://www.mypyramid.gov>

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3040190

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3040218

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3042055

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3040203

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3040200

(NOTE: donation page: we will send the book for free with a $150 tax-deductible donation)

Important Web sites on Nutrition:

5-a-day campaign
www.5aday.com

Center for Science in the Public Interest
www.cspinet.org

Produce for a Better Health Foundation
www.pbhfoundation.org

Association of Black Cardiologists
http://www.abcardio.org

The National Diabetes Eduation Program
www.ndep.nih.gov

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
www.nhlbi.nih.gov

Information on the DASH diet from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/new_dash.pdf

Information on Blood Pressure from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/hypertension/express.pdf

American Dietetic Association
http://www.eatright.org

ADA African American Link
http://www.eatright.org

American Health Association
http://www.americanheart.org

American Cancer Association
http://www.cancer.org

American Diabetes Association
http://www.diabetes.org

American Stroke Association
http://www.strokeassociation.org